Category Archives: Marc Bouwer

New York Fashion Week Trend Report

Hey Glamazons!

So you stocked up on Red Bull, threw on your fur, strapped on your Louboutins and survived Fashion Week chaos alongside Ferocia and I. And we love you for it!

After the last show at Bryant Park ends (which was Tommy Hilfiger, fyi), the “Empire State of Mind” song fades and the models change into regular duds and go home, it’s time for editors to pick the trends of the season. Well, those who are unlucky enough to not be attending the London and Paris shows (I always laugh at the scene in “Devil Wears Prada” where Emily is dying to go to Paris Fashion Week. That’s so me!).

Here’s a preliminary roundup of the standout trends we saw at New York Fashion Week. Tell us what’s your favorite and what you’d never wear in a million years!

-FUR

PETA, don’t hate me. From colorful fur coats at Zac Posen to fur-trimmed jackets at Marc Jacobs, fur is the most luxurious way to stay warm next Fall. And the opulent material is no longer just for coats.

Fur-trimmed booties, purses and blouses were everywhere on the runway, like the fab fur-trimmed gloves at Brian Reyes. Designers like Marc Bouwer showed faux, PETA-friendly alternatives, which offer a guilt-free way to be lavish. Check out our faves:

Zac Posen
Michael Kors

Marc Jacobs

Stephen Burrows

Marc Bouwer

Boy by Band of Outsiders

Brian Reyes

-MILITARY DETAILING

When financial strife hits, fashion responds with clothes for work in strong, utilitarian silhouettes. The sharp shoulders of the 1940’s were an answer to the financial strife of the Great Depression and the need for women to work during World War II.

With recession-induced panic spreading at a fever pitch, and today’s war on terror, there is no better time for fashion to embody a brave, valiant spirit. Military looks accomplish just that. From Deola Sagoe, who presented at the Arise Magazine fashion show, to Vivienne Tam, power ruled the runway for Fall. Salute!

Deola Sangoe, Arise

Nanette Lepore

Vivienne Tam

-VELVET

Rich, opulent textures made their presence known on the Fall runways, but none was as important as velvet. The fabric was reborn in silhouettes that ranged from short and sexy (Alexander Wang) to long and luxurious (Nanette Lepore). A velvet blazer at L’Wren Scott offered a practical way to wear the look for day. Whether going to the office or hitting the red carpet, there are plenty of ways to rock Fall’s fabric du jour.

Alexander Wang



Marc Jacobs
Rachel Roy

L’Wren Scott

Nanette Lepore

-WIDELEG PANTS

Though cigarette pants, tights and even some leggings were a staple on the catwalk, everyone’s talking about the reemergence of the wideleg pant.

Fluid, oversized pants made a triumphant return to the runway paired with everything from suit jackets to knits. The new twist? Experimentations with color at Malandrino (orange) and 3.1 Phillip Lim (gold) that refuse to go unnoticed.

Rebecca Taylor

3.1 Phillip Lim

Charlotte Ronson

Malandrino

-PATCHWORK

DKNY promised to present patchwork in their Fall 2010 sketch, and boy, did they deliver! The patches from Grandma’s quilt got a modern and sophisticated update on chunky sweaters at Yigal Azrouel and short, fitted dresses at DKNY. Rodarte had a particularly artful spin on the trend with colors and prints all weaved into one stunning blouse. Grandmas, don’t try this at home.

DKNY

Rodarte

Yigal Azrouel

-CAMEL

While designers didn’t shy away from an occasional pop of color, most collections were rooted in understated tones, like gray and camel. The latter is a warm and rich staple that looks clean and sophisticated without feeling drab. Michael Kors showed almost an entire collection of camel looks (in line with his safari theme) while newcomer LaQuan Smith‘s collection presented the neutral color alongside oceanic tones of blue.

Zac Posen
3.1 Phillip Lim
Michael Kors
Boy by Band of Outsiders

LaQuan Smith

-LEGS!!

I don’t like pants, and apparently, many Fall 2010 New York Fashion Week designers share my sentiment. More than ever, several collections skipped pants altogether sending dresses, shorts and skirts down the catwalk.

Of course, I find this thrilling but it presents a dilemma: how does a sexy girl brave the cold with her legs out during the Fall? Designers like Alexander Wang and Elie Tahari have the perfect solution: legwarmers and thigh-high boots…for the fashionista who wants to stay warm while looking hot.

Alexander Wang

Elie Tahari

Vera Wang

L’Wren Scott

Rag & Bone
-GRAFFITI PRINTS
What once was a pastime for urban rebels has become a legitimate work of art. Heralded for its gritty yet artful flair, graffiti prints are being embraced by designers like Tory Burch and J Brand for Proenza Schouler
Coupled with trend-focused silhouettes, 90’s-esque graffiti looks make a chic yet creative statement that shoppers are sure to love. And city girls, like me, who loved graffiti all along will be happy to wear their support on their sleeves, literally. See our top looks below:

Tory Burch

Proenza Schouler

Proenza Schouler

Diesel Black Gold

What do you think of our favorite Fall New York Fashion Week trends? What are your favorites? What are you tired of seeing? What would you never be caught dead in? Discuss.

Kisses,

Coutura

Advertisements

Fashion Week EXCLUSIVE: Behind-the-Scenes Video of Marc Bouwer Fall 2010



Marc Bouwer is more than a designer; he’s a visionary. The talent behind red-carpet gowns for Beyonce’, Jennifer Lopez, Mariah Carey and Rihanna, Bouwer is the first designer to ever host a virtual runway show. Now, Calvin Klein, Michael Kors, Alexander Wang and Isaac Mizrahi are all following suit. (Sidenote: I got an invite to Isaac Mizrahi’s show this season! Super excited!).


Marc Bouwer is also a pioneer in his passionate campaign against animal cruelty. In 2002, he was the first designer to present a collection completely devoid of animal products. The groundbreaking collection was sponsored by PETA, who later honored Bouwer with the PETA Humanitarian award. 


I was honored to land an exclusive invite to the taping of Marc Bouwer’s Fall 2010 virtual runway show. Famous for his eye for detail and sophisticated draping techniques, Bouwer has been one of my favorite glamorous, red-carpet designers. And let’s face it, he has amazing hair.


Between dressing Victoria’s Secret Angel, Candice Swanepoel, and chatting with the director, Carl Byrd, Marc took a moment to speak with me about the inspiration behind his Fall 2010 collection (chocolate!), his affinity for faux fur and the young, sexy starlet he’d love to dress.


Check out our behind-the-scenes video and read the full interview below. Don’t forget to visit http://www.marcbouwer.com on February 18th at 9AM EST for a front-row seat to the debut of Bouwer’s stunning collection.





Coutura: What was your inspiration for the new collection?


Marc Bouwer:  I envisioned a beautiful woman wearing these avante garde clothes walking through a celestial universe and thinking about a past lover. The colors were inspired by a velvet box with a burgundy ribbon that you open up and inside are chocolates in metallic wrappers, hence the jewel tones, the turquoises, purples, burgundies, golds and silvers. Then you unwrap them and there’s this gorgeous, dark chocolate. It’s a rich, sensual experience.

Coutura: Chocolate and lovers? Sounds perfect. I see metallic is a strong theme in this collection, which is different than what you’ve shown before. In what other ways is Fall 2010 different than your previous collections?


MB: A little more avante garde and futuristic. Fashion is moving in that direction but it’s not just about padded shoulders. It’s all about extending the sleeve—a tight silhouette with explosions in the neck, the sleeves, the hip or the back, in architectural angles. And now that I have three different lines [his eponymous line, the moderately-priced Marc Bouwer GlamIt! and M by Marc Bouwer, a line on QVC], I can afford to be more experimental and spend a little more money with my Marc Bouwer Collection line.


Coutura: You’re adept at changing with the times and the virtual runway show is an example of that. Why did you choose to host a virtual show instead of a traditional show?

MB: We were the first to have a virtual show because I wanted to give the whole world a front row seat: school kids, mothers, editors and celebrities. [Traditional shows have] become a celebrity circus and I’m not so concerned about getting celebrities to my show—they wear my clothes. I want everyone to see it. The disadvantage to putting on a live show during Fashion Week is that it’s very expensive, costing $300,000 and more; and editors and journalists can’t always make it.


Coutura: You’re also a pioneer when it comes to anti-fur activism and I’m really proud of what you’ve accomplished, including your PETA humanitarian award. Fur is a huge trend on the runway this season. How are you combating that and offering an alternative in your collection?


MB: People need to become aware of the process: when animals are killed to make fur, their skin is ripped off of them while they’re still alive and they’re thrown in corners to die. If you want that look, technology has given us a way to recreate it. I have a faux fox jacket in my latest collection. To spread awareness, I always speak out at interviews and to celebrities.

Coutura: Speaking of celebrities, Beyonce looked gorgeous in your dress at the launch party for ‘Heat.’


MB: Thank you. She’s beautiful. She also wore one of my dresses in Paris.


Coutura: You’ve dressed so many beautiful ladies, Angelina Jolie, Halle Berry, Sarah Jessica Parker. What celebrity would you like to dress that you haven’t yet?



MB: I’ve worked with so many. Even the young girls like Taylor Swift and Rihanna. I’d say Megan Fox. And I always wanted to dress Nicole Kidman and finally, we did.


Coutura: Congratulations! I love Nicole. Well, I’m sure celebrities and editors will fall in love with this new collection. Thank you for speaking with us.


MB: My pleasure, thank you for coming. 

Don’t miss the show: Marc Bouwer Fall 2010 airing February 18th at 9AM EST on http://www.marcbouwer.com.